April 23, 2024

The water’s movement may solve marine exploration problems that traditional power generation cannot.

The ocean is an excellent source of power for buoys.

Catia Rodriguez of the University of Porto will speak at the AIP Publishing Horizons – Energy Storage and Conversion Virtual Conference, to be held on August 4-6, 2021. She will discuss the possibilities of using power generators within the oceans for marine exploration. The three-day conference will feature the presentation “Performance Of Triboelectric Nanogenerators Based On Rolling Spheres Motion Under Realistic Water Wave Conditions.”

Traditional energy harvesting technology, such as photovoltaics or wind turbines, needs several limitations, including their inability to operate continuously and their intermittent nature. The absence of sunlight and wind will not allow either to produce any energy.

Wave energy is the most apparent solution for ocean buoys. The ocean’s waves are abundant, predictable, and consistent. They can be used as a source of power for navigation buoys.

“The development of wave energy converters is still not at its full potential because of the lack of a technological consensus, high energy production costs and irregular and low frequency waves at sea,” said Rodrigues.

The team created sphere-based nanogenerators that convert mechanical motion to electrical power. These devices can be integrated directly into navigational buoys to generate electricity using ocean waves.

The maximum voltages were determined by testing TENGs in natural conditions on a scale of 1:8. They found that the highest voltages could be generated when the waves are at 0.1 meters, approximately every 2.6 seconds — which is close to the floatation period. The TENGs are more efficient than standard generators, even when the waves are slow and inconsistent.

“The development of wave energy converters is still not at its full potential because of the lack of a technological consensus, high energy production costs and irregular and low frequency waves at sea,” said Rodrigues.

The team created sphere-based nanogenerators that convert mechanical motion to electrical power. These devices can be integrated directly into navigational buoys to generate electricity using ocean waves.

The maximum voltages were determined by testing TENGs in natural conditions on a scale of 1:8. They found that the highest voltages could be generated when the waves are at 0.1 meters tall and occur every 2.6 seconds — which is close to the period of the buoy. The TENGs are more efficient than standard generators, even when the waves are slow and inconsistent.

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